messages from:

PLAN Z El Espacio, Palau Altea, Spain

30 November 2017 by Micael Norberg

planz altea 1 PLAN Z  El Espacio, Palau Altea, Spain

planz altea 3 PLAN Z  El Espacio, Palau Altea, Spain

“In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles. Everything that was directly lived has receded into a representation.” – One channel video, 07.20 min min video loop, HD,B/W, no sound

In Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’, Alice finds herself in a race with the Red Queen. After running for a while she becomes confused as to why she’s remaining in the same spot.“Well, in our country,” said Alice, still panting a little, “you’d generally get to somewhere else if you run very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.” “A slow sort of country!” said the Queen. “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!”

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“In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles.”

09 October 2017 by Micael Norberg

micael norberg 1 “In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles.”

micael norberg 2 “In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles.”

micael norberg 3 “In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles.”

“In societies dominated by modern conditions of production, life is presented as an immense accumulation of spectacles. Everything that was directly lived has receded into a representation.” – One channel video, 07.20 min min video loop, HD,B/W, no sound

In Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’, Alice finds herself in a race with the Red Queen. After running for a while she becomes confused as to why she’s remaining in the same spot.“Well, in our country,” said Alice, still panting a little, “you’d generally get to somewhere else if you run very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.” “A slow sort of country!” said the Queen. “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!”

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Comment penser librement à l’ombre d’une chapelle?

05 August 2017 by Micael Norberg

Rovaniemi 3 BW 1 Comment penser librement à lombre dune chapelle? Rovaniemi 3 BW 2 Comment penser librement à lombre dune chapelle? Rovaniemi 3 BW 3  Comment penser librement à lombre dune chapelle?

“Comment penser librement à l’ombre d’une chapelle?(How can one think freely in the shadow of a chapel?)” – One channel video, 06.o0 min video loop, HD, B/W, no sound – 14.9 – 15.10.2017, Galleria Valo, Arktikum. Rovaniemi, Finland

So ‘How can one think freely in the shadow of a chapel?’ as the Situationists framed it. How can we reclaim what is on its way to become lost and what should we do when even the art and the universities are being eaten alive in the shadow of new public management, elitism, new liberalism and markets forces? Is the university, education and art on the verge of becoming a part of Debords ‘spectacle’ or is it already a ‘spectacle’? Power is in one definition a ‘possession of controlling influence’. Power structures that exists around us are based on social, cultural and economic class so ‘how can one think freely in the shadow of a chapel?’. Yes, history repeats itself in new forms and in new shapes, we can only hope that we remember and learned something of our past.

“…. it really seems as though old Hegel, in the guise of the World Spirit, were directing history from the grave and, with the greatest conscientiousness, causing everything to be re-enacted twice over, once as grand tragedy and the second time as rotten farce, Caussidière for Danton, L. Blanc for Robespierre, Barthélemy for Saint-Just, Flocon for Carnot, and the moon-calf together with the first available dozen debt-encumbered lieutenants for the little corporal and his band of marshals. Thus the 18th Brumaire would already be upon us.” – 9 Marx/Engels Collected Works. International Publishers.
https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/410.htm#cite

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Comment penser librement à l’ombre d’une chapelle?

04 August 2017 by Micael Norberg

shadow Comment penser librement à lombre dune chapelle?

“Comment penser librement à l’ombre d’une chapelle?”
– Color Photograph, 100 x70 cm, Micael Norberg, 2017

In the preface to the second edition of The Eighteenth Brumaire, Marx stated that the purpose of this essay was to “demonstrate how the class struggle in France created circumstances and relationships that made it possible for a grotesque mediocrity to play a hero’s part.”
This essay contains the most famous formulation of Marx’s view of the role of the individual in history, often translated to something like: “Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past.” Unfortunately this translation obscures the meaning of his line, which should be read more like “People (die Menschen) make their own history, but they do not make it however they want, not under self-selected circumstances, but out of the actual given and transmitted situation. The traditions of all the dead generations burden, like a nightmare, the minds of the living.”
The Eighteenth Brumaire catalogs the mass of the bourgeoisie, which Marx says impounded the republic like its property, as composed of: the large landowners, the aristocrats of finance and big industrialists, the high dignitaries of the army, the university, the church, the bar, the academy, and the press. It also shows more criticism of the proletariat than is typical of his other works, referring to the bureaucracy as a “giant parasitic body” and describing widespread perceptions of the proletariat as a “party of anarchy, socialism, and communism,” a party paradoxically established on precepts of an oppositional “party of order.” – The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eighteenth_Brumaire_of_Louis_Napoleon)

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Retour a la normale

15 July 2017 by Micael Norberg

retour Retour a la normale

“Retour a la normale” 
– Color Photograph, 100 x70 cm, Micael Norberg, 2017

“What can be done to create alternatives to capitalism in a world organized largely (even if not totally) by the logic of capital? What could be prefigured in Seattle in 1999, or later, in the Occupy encampments of 2011? In capitalist society, most what we do in school and work is governed by the logic of capital, and even leisure time is determined as the time left over after work (and that time is rapidly disappearing for reasons I have discussed elsewhere). Without a doubt certain forms of alter-relationality (relations beyond exchange relations) and human solidarity are available for direct experience in social movements, and these are all good things, and good reasons to participate. But, in the existing capitalist world, people invariably “retour à la normale” as appeared on the popular poster in Paris during the uprisings of May-June 1968. Seattle and Occupy protestors rupture the normality of everyday life, but the call to return to normal can only be resisted for so long before having to go back to work, school, etc. The return to normal demonstrates the power and pull of capital”.- Specters of Revolt: On The Intellect Of Insurrection And Philosophy From Below – Richard Gilman-Opalsky, 2016

In Specters of Revolt Gilman-Opalsky argues that the world is haunted by revolt, by the possibility of events that interrupt and disrupt the world, that throw its reality and justice into question. But recent revolt is neither decisively communist nor decisively Marxist. Gilman-Opalsky develops a theory of revolt that accounts for its diverse critical content about autonomy, everyday life, anxiety, experience, knowledge, and possibility.

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Begär – Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten

10 June 2017 by Micael Norberg

per21 Begär   Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten per221 Begär   Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten gerd21 Begär   Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten gerd221 Begär   Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten per2221 Begär   Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman at Galleri Verkligheten

Begär – Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman

de⋅sire /di’zaɪər/
noun
the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
an inclination to want things • a man of many desires
something that is desired
verb 1
feel or have a desire for; want strongly
syn: want
expect and wish
syn: hope, trust
express a desire for
1 Usage sample:
They desire to move.
ORIGIN: c.1230, from Old French desirer, from Latin desiderare “long for, wish for,” original sense perhaps “await what the stars will bring,” from the phrase de sidere “from the stars,” from sidus (gen. sideris) “heavenly body, star, constellation” (cf. consider). Noun sense of “lust” is first recorded c.1340.

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Rehearsal – Begär

19 May 2017 by Micael Norberg

gerd1 Rehearsal   Begär daniel111 Rehearsal   Begär daniel11 Rehearsal   Begär per1 Rehearsal   Begär per11 Rehearsal   Begär

Begär – Gerd Aurell, Per Nilsson, Daniel Westman

“A rehearsal is an activity in the performing arts that occurs as preparation for a performance in music, theatre, dance and related arts, such as opera, musical theatre and film production. It is undertaken as a form of practising, to ensure that all details of the subsequent performance are adequately prepared and coordinated. The term “rehearsal” typically refers to ensemble activities undertaken by a group of people. For example, when a musician is preparing a piano concerto in their music studio, this is called “practicing”, but when they practice the concerto with an orchestra, this is called a “rehearsal”. The music rehearsal takes place in a music rehearsal space”. – Wikipedia

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Postapocalyptic

19 December 2016 by Micael Norberg

1483372040 Postapocalyptic
Methanethiol.

“ Also known as methyl mercaptan is an organosulfur compound with the chemical formula CH3SH. It is a colorless gas with a distinctive putrid smell. It is a natural substance found in the blood and brain of humans and other animals as well as plant tissues. It is disposed of through animal feces. It occurs naturally in certain foods, such as some nuts and cheese. It is also one of the main compounds responsible for bad breath and the smell of flatus. Methanethiol is classified as a thiol and is sometimes abbreviated as MeSH. It is very flammable”. – Engraved stone , 30 x30x40 cm, 2016

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happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness

14 December 2016 by Micael Norberg

happiness still 1 happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness happiness still 2 happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness happiness still 3 happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness happiness still 4 happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness

“Those two, in paradise, were given a choice: happiness without freedom or freedom without happiness. There was no third option”- four channel video installation
10 min video loop, HD, color, stereo
Micael Norberg, 2016

Opening and artist talk with Micael Norberg, Academy of Fine Arts and Dr. Anna Foka Humlab-X – Nov 25th, 2016 , 15.00 Humlab-X, Arts Campus, Umeå University

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How could liberty ever establish itself amongst us?

14 August 2016 by Micael Norberg

the revoulution How could liberty ever establish itself amongst us?“How could liberty ever establish itself amongst us? Apart from a few tragic scenes, the revolution has been nothing but a web of farcical scenes.”

How could liberty ever have established itself amongst us? Apart from several tragic scenes, the revolution has been nothing but a web of farcical scenes… But it is in the nation’s senate that the most grotesque parades have taken place. – Jean-Paul Marat
– Black and White Photograph, 50 x70 cm, 2016

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Tenderloin

10 April 2016 by Micael Norberg

Tenderloin Tenderloin

“The apartment where Dashiell Hammett wrote The Maltese Falcon was once in the boundaries of the Tenderloin at the corner of Hyde and Post. Both the movie and book The Maltese Falcon were based in San Francisco’s Tenderloin. There is also an alley in what is now Nob Hill, named for the book’s author (Dashiell Hammett). It lies outside the Tenderloin because the boundary was defined with borders different from today’s. Some locations, such as Sam Spade’s apartment and John’s Grill, also no longer lie in the Tenderloin because local economics and real estate have changed the character and labeling of areas over time”.

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Hotel Whitcomb

08 April 2016 by Micael Norberg

Selfportr Hotel Whitcomb

“Welcome to San Francisco’s historic Hotel Whitcomb, an early 20th-century masterpiece that is a favorite among travelers. When you walk through the front doors of the landmark Hotel Whitcomb from bustling Market Street, you’ll discover an elegant boutique hotel with high cathedral ceilings and lovely interiors recalling turn-of-the-century architecture.

 

San Francisco History. History makes the Hotel Whitcomb unique in structure and aura. After the 1906 earthquake ruined the city, the hotel served as San Francisco’s temporary City Hall from 1912 to 1915″.

 

Downtown San Francisco Hotel. Located on Market Street, across from the Orpheum Theater, the hotel is a San Francisco sanctuary surrounded by trendy Soma and Hayes Valley restaurants, shops and attractions. You’ll enjoy walking or riding the Cable Cars to the Theatre District, Yerba Buena Gardens, The Castro District, City Hall, the Moscone Centre, Union Square, the Financial District, Fisherman’s Wharf, Chinatown, Golden Gate Bridge, AT&T Park and Ghirardelli Square.

 

Rooms & Suites. The hotel’s 460 spacious and beautifully-appointed guest rooms and 12 parlor suites deliver a luxurious hospitality experience with an array of modern amenities and exceptional value. For an unforgettable experience, the Penthouse Governor’s Suite offers spectacular views of San Francisco.

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London/Victoria – 10 Feb 08.33

10 February 2016 by Micael Norberg

London Victoria e1465281189483 London/Victoria   10 Feb 08.33

Notes II

Aristotle made distinctions between kinds of knowledge that people can secure.
The three types he identified were the theoretical, the practical, and the productive (McKeon, 2001).


Inquiry always yields tentative conclusions rather than permanently nailed down facts.

The theoretical,
The practical,

productive

The quest for certainty, as Dewey (1929/2005) pointed out, is hopeless.

 

pertained

pertained
be relevant to

 

My remark pertained to your earlier comments syn: refer, relate, concern, come to, bear on, touch, touch on, have-to doe with
The theoretical pertained to efforts to know things that were of necessity, that is, things and processes that could be no other way than the way they are.

What does it mean to know? Here, too,there are a variety of conditions under which the term know or knowledge can be used.One can know that something is the case.
The processes and products of nature are prime examples.
Practical knowledge was knowledge of

have very few words and virtually all of them inadequate for describing what water tastes like, or what music sounds like, or what someone looks like?

Words, except when they are used artistically, are proxiesfor direct experience.
proxies
proxies
a person authorized to act for another

 

They point us in a direction in which we can undergo what the words purport to reveal. Words, in this sense, are like cues to guide us on a journey.

– Art and Knowledge (Handbook of the arts in qualitative research, 2008, Elliot Eisner)

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South Lambeth – 9 Feb 11.22

09 February 2016 by Micael Norberg

South Lambeth e1456493621644 South Lambeth   9 Feb 11.22

Notes I

impediments

something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress
This aim is wholly congruent with current efforts to make distinctions between types of research, even to redefine the meanings of research so that they are no longer singular, but multiple.

 

> in Plato’s caves were really surrogates or proxies for the distractions that our senses imposed upon whatever our rational mind could possibly muster.
Put most simply, the sensory systems that were stimulated through the arts were mislead- ing; they lead one away rather than toward that form of critical rationality upon which truth depends.
Research differs in the ways in which it is conducted and in the products that it yields.

> What one needs to research in a situation must be appropriate for the circumstances one addresses and the aims one attempts to achieve.

> The model that they have provided has impacted our conception of intelligence and of rationality itself.
Aristotle cautions us that an educated man expects only as much precision as the subject matter will admit.

> It is not surprising, therefore, that it should have provided the model that has shaped our conception of science.

> It is as foolish to seek approximations from mathematicians as exactitudes from poets (McKeon,2001).

> What the term knowledge means depends on how inquiry is undertaken and the kind of problem one pursues.

 

> noun.

> Knowledge as a term is a noun.Knowing is a verb. And knowing may be a much more appropriate descriptor of the processes of inquiry made in pursuit of a problem that will not yield to a set of rigidified procedures.

 

> verb.

> The arts traditionally have been regarded as ornamental or emotional in character. Their connection to epistemological issues, at least in the modern day, has not been a strong one. Are the arts merely ornamentala aspects of human production and experience or do they have a more significant role to play in enlarging human understanding?

> The positivist tradition that has animated western philosophy during the first half of the 20th century viewed the arts as largely emotive rather than primarily informative. The arts are forms that you enjoyed,or felt strongly about, or savored for their delicacy.

> They had little todo with matters of knowledge. For knowledge of the empirical world you rely upon synthetic propositions whose truth value can be deter-mined. And if you needed to know something about logical relation-ships, analytic propositions were the sources of data you would manage or manipulate (Ayer, 1952).

> We seek out the arts in order to take a ride on the wings that art forms provide

 

> contingencies.
>contingencies.

>contingencies.
>a possible event or occurrence or result syn: eventuality, contingence

>The productive form of knowledge was knowledge of how to make something.

>The sensory side of human experience is primary in the arts, or so it is believed.

>In differentiating types of knowledge, Aristotle comes closer than Plato to the kind of artistry that is relevant to arts-informed qualitative research.
Plato himself regarded the senses as impediments to the achievement of that exalted state in which forms could be known (Plato, 1992).

>impediments

 
>Art and Knowledge (Handbook of the arts in qualitative research, 2008, Elliot Eisner)

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London, Stockwell – 7 Feb 09.40

07 February 2016 by Micael Norberg

London Stockwell e1456493144812 London, Stockwell    7 Feb 09.40

Notes II

impediments

*I frequently lament a particularly prevalent pathology of our time — our extreme impatience with the dynamic process of attaining knowledge and transmuting it into wisdom. We want to have the knowledge, as if it were a static object, but we don’t want to do the work of claiming it — and so we reach for simulacra that compress complex ideas into listicles and two-minute animated explainers*.

https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/08/27/hegel-knowledge-phenomenology-of-mind/

 

In the Mahasaccaka Sutta, dhyana is followed by insight into the four truths. The mention of the four noble truths as constituting ”liberating insight” is probably a later addition. Originally the practice of dhyana itself may have constituted the core liberating practice of early Buddhism, since in this state all ”pleasure and pain” had waned.

 

[P]robably the word ”immortality” (a-mata) was used by the Buddha for the first interpretation of this experience and not the term cessation of suffering that belongs to the four noble truths. The Buddha did not achieve the experience of salvation by discerning the four noble truths and/ or other data. But his experience must have been of such a nature that it could bear the interpretation” achieving immortality”.

 

(Could I walk myself to knowledge?)
What was the question you asked?

 

A process by which that knowledge is produced.

 

*An acre was defined in the Middle Ages, being the amount of land that could be plough in one day with a yoke of oxen*.

 

Within anthropology liminality describes a moment and a
state between two positions (socially, physically or in terms of consciousness) where there is no before or after, but the equilibrium is a condition in itself.

 

Sama is a means of meditating on God through focusing on melodies and dancing. It brings out a person’s love of God, purifies the soul, and is a way of finding God. This practice is said to reveal what is already in one’s heart, rather than creating emotions.All of a person’s doubt disappears, and the heart and soul can communicate directly with God. The immediate goal of sama’ is to reach wajd, which is a trance-like state of ecstasy.Physically, this state may include various and unexpected movements, agitation, and all types of dancing. Another state that people hope to reach through sama’ is khamra, which means ”spiritual drunkenness”. Ultimately, people hope to achieve the unveiling of mysteries and gain spiritual knowledge through wajd.[10] Sometimes, the experience of wajd becomes so strong that fainting or even, in extreme circumstances, death citation required, occurs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sama_%28Sufism%29

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Diest, Belgium – 1 Feb 09.50

01 February 2016 by Micael Norberg

Diest e1456492132849 Diest, Belgium   1 Feb 09.50

Notes III

impediments

(Do I have any questions?, Yes of course, I have many, don’t you?)

 

In the film Paris Texas, the first shot is a bird’s eye-view of the desert, a bleak, dry, alien landscape. Shots follow of old advertisement billboards, placards, graffiti, rusty iron carcasses, old railway lines, neon signs, motels and seemingly never-ending roads. A man in a suit and red cap walks out of the desert. He has been away. Disappeared to a place ”without language or streets”

(and now he is on his way back).

 

(I don’t have words. I have images)

 

The body is an image in my head.
Every step is a focus and a track leading from or to,
Or the other way around.
Every dust cloud is a confirmation.
Of a physical presence in a landscape

 

If we agree on seeing communication as a connection allowing access between persons or places . I would say that the intro to Paris Texas has that connection. There are no words. But it communicates. It is possible to communicate a deeper understanding, a process and a new understanding through images.

 

and

 

Guy Debord when designing *Psychogeography* was well aware of the excursion to Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre the 14 april 1921 the Dada group had planned. They had planned a series of excursions to places that “*have no real reason to exist*” the
the first excursion took place April 14, 1921 to the cemetery in Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre

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Zonhoven – Belgium 30 Jan 15.03

30 January 2016 by Micael Norberg

Zonhoven e1456492815363 Zonhoven   Belgium 30 Jan 15.03

Notes IV

impediments

 

The four main postures of the body: standing, sitting, lying down and walking

 

– Body
*Walking*

 

> Tool (the means whereby some act is accomplished)
Method (a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps) –
Process (a particular course of action intended to achieve a result)
Resultat (a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomena)
Knowledge (the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning)

 

Forest monks, these days still go wandering; it’s called Tudong. They take their bowls and robes and walk seeking out secluded places to meditate. In preparation to go out wandering, they progressively increase the amount of walking meditation so as to develop their physical fitness and endurance. They increase the number of hours of walking meditation a day to at least five or six hours.

 

If you are walking an average of four or five kilometres an hour and doing five hours of walking meditation a day, the number of kilometres builds up.

 

As an example, Ajahn Chah used to recommend that once a week we stay up all night. We would sit and walk meditation throughout the night. One tends to get very drowsy by one or two in the morning, so Ajahn Chah would recommend doing walking meditation, walking backwards as a way of overcoming drowsiness.

 

You don’t fall asleep walking backwards!

 

“What was madness, and how do you know when it happens to you?”– Robert Charles Wilson. “A Bridge of Years.”

 

The concept of time not being a fixed phenomenon, but something that was essentially subjective and unstable. She adopted Einstein’s notion of the ‘relativistic universe’ to describe the idea of constant metamorphosis – of becoming as opposed to being. *http://saint-lucy.com/essays/maya-deren*/

 

(and all the things you want to forget)

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122m in a direction away from a lake (one hundred [and] twenty-seven)

11 October 2015 by Micael Norberg

IMG 2964 122m in a direction away from a lake (one hundred [and] twenty seven)

As a Mersenne prime, 127 is related to the perfect number 8128. 127 is also an exponent for another Mersenne prime 2127 – 1 (2127 – 1), which was discovered by Édouard Lucas in 1876, and held the record for the largest known prime for 75 years – it is still the largest prime ever discovered by hand calculations. Furthermore, 127 is equal to 27 – 1, and because 7 is also a Mersenne prime, this makes 127 a double Mersenne prime.

 

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(one hundred [and] twenty-two)

09 August 2015 by Micael Norberg

Walking 1507 2607 (one hundred [and] twenty two)

It is a nontotient since there is no integer with exactly 122 coprimes below it. Nor is there an integer with exactly 122 integers with common factors below it, making 122 a noncototient. (*In number theory, a nontotientis a positive integer n which is not a totient number: it is not in the range of Euler’s totient function φ, that is, the equation φ(x) = n has no solution x. In other words, n is a nontotient if there is no integer x that has exactly ncoprimes below it. All odd numbers are nontotients, except 1, since it has the solutions x = 1 and x = 2.)*

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A permanent mark on a physical body

09 January 2015 by Micael Norberg

a permanent mark A permanent mark on a physical body

Boiling down a conversation that has been ongoing for years to a few pages of text is a complicated thing to do. Boiling down experiences gathered over the span of half a lifetime is even more so. In the beginning of this project, mingling two different people’s notions of existence into one body of text seemed to provide nothing but confusion and frustration. But there turned out to be some points of connection, bright lights that started to indicate a path. It was loosely defined, sometimes lost from sight, but nonetheless a common ground. What started to emerge was a shared notion of being.  A being among beings. Being aware of the creeping sensation of becoming aware through a bodily experience. Being there-ness, a sensation brought upon the flesh through needles and patterns.  It could have been anything, of course. The prick of the needle is just the beginning, the thin sliver of sunlight indicating that a door has been opened. Walking through that door is a different thing altogether…notes by emma ewadotter & micael norberg

 

A permanent mark on a physical body
Artistic Research Funds, Umeå Academy of Fine Arts, Umeå University
emma ewadotter & micael norberg, 2012 – 2014
Printed at Original, Umeå 2014
ISBN: 978-91-981846-2-4
produktioner ISSN 1653-6193

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Kite Aerial Photography – Hué

08 January 2015 by Micael Norberg

kite aerial photography Kite Aerial Photography   Hué

The Kite Aerial Photography – Hué project started with the intention from Mattias Ericsson and me Micael Norberg to work artistically on a jointly project with students from different art schools and from different cultures. We had an idea of building bridges both artistically and culturally. We travelled to Hué, Vietnam to explore new ways of collaboration and find new artistic methods. We wanted to suspend our cameras from kites, send them aloft, and take aerial photographs. We tried to find a way to control events, control our artistic outcome and understanding. However, in the The Kite Aerial Photography project we had no control. The weather controlled our kites. The place and the language controlled what we knew and understood. All that remained was to look into our self and negate a compromise. The leftovers of that compromise became the documentations and artifice of an experience.

 

And now I am looking back at those events, wondering what really happened. I am using words, trying to create an image of my memories and of my experience – hot air, smells and noise. Experiences I can’t communicate fully in words. You as a viewer will never feel them and I will only remember them. We will also remember differently. Every participant has his or her own image of what happened during those days in Hué. The feeling of being different, not understanding and being an outsider caused us to reflect on our experiences in different ways. We believed that language would build bridges of understanding, and maybe it did. But here we are now. A long time has passed since we returned from Hué. What we have left are images and memories. I remember smells and emotions and in this state between memory and fact, a tension is created.  I look at the photographs now with a new understanding. We tried to move out of our comfort-zone looking for the unseen, the enigma, where memory and reflection becomes a liminal state. I now realize that knowledge is not fact or truth, but a state, which we can call ”not knowing”. A state, which for me is the very basis for understanding, and by that, becomes the very essence of art.

Micael Norberg, Umeå, Sweden

 

This project is made with financial support from Artistic Research Funds, Umeå Academy of Fine Arts, Umeå University and we are deeply thankful for the support from Dr. Phan Thanh Binh, Rector at Hué College of fine Arts for letting us realise this project at Hué College of Fine Arts in Vietnam . We are also grateful for all the help and assistance we got from Mr. Huy Do at the painting department at Hué College of fine Arts and without the help and knowledge of master kite builder and artist Mr. Nguyen Van Hoang this project would not have been possible.

 

We also want to send our thanks to the students from Hué participating in the project:
Lê Thị Tâm, Hồ Đăng Chính, Nguyễn Hải Thăng, Lê Xuân Thắng, Nguyễn Thanh Nam, Hoàng Đức Nam, Ngô Phương Dung, Phan Nhật Bình, Tôn Thất Hiếu, Nguyễn Thị Hảo
and  Trần Ngọc Trân

 

Andreas Brännström – Mattias Ericsson – Camilla Lundquist – Micael Norberg
– Alva Willemark – Johan Österholm. 2012 – 2014

 

Original, Umeå
Paper: Munken Lynx Rough 150g, Munken Lynx Rough 300g
Produktioner/Productions ISSN 1653-6193
ISBN 978-91-981846-1-7

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Momo

20 December 2014 by Micael Norberg

momo 150104 Momo

Momo oder Die seltsame Geschichte von den Zeit-Dieben und von dem Kind, das den Menschen die gestohlene Zeit zurückbrachte –  Momo, or the strange story of the time-thieves and the child who brought the stolen time back to the people.

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Warsaw – 26 Nov 09.12

27 November 2014 by Micael Norberg

Warzaw Warsaw   26 Nov 09.12

Until the early 19th century, the function of the zoo was often to symbolise royal power, like King Louis XIV’s menagerie at Versailles. The modern zoo that emerged in the early 19th century at London, Paris and Dublin, was focused on providing educational exhibits to the public for entertainment and inspiration. A growing fascination for natural history and zoology, coupled with the tremendous expansion in the urbanisation of European cities, led to a heightened demand for a greater variety of public forms of entertainment to be made available. The need for public entertainment, as well as the requirements of scholarly research, came together in the founding of the first modern zoos.

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